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Minor Agreement Deutsch

Minor agreement in Deutsch, also known as «Kongruenzregeln,» refers to the grammatical rule that determines how different parts of a German sentence must agree with each other in terms of number, gender, and case.

In the German language, there are three types of minor agreement: subject-verb agreement, adjective-noun agreement, and pronoun-noun agreement.

Subject-verb agreement in German is straightforward: the verb must agree with the subject in number and person. For example, in the sentence «Die Katze jagt die Maus» (The cat hunts the mouse), the verb «jagt» (hunts) agrees with the subject «die Katze» (the cat), which is singular and third person.

Adjective-noun agreement is a bit more complex. German adjectives must agree with the noun they are modifying in gender, number, and case. For instance, in the phrase «der große Hund» (the big dog), the adjective «große» (big) agrees with the masculine noun «Hund» (dog), which is singular and in the nominative case.

Finally, pronoun-noun agreement in German works much like in English. Pronouns must agree with the noun they are referring to in gender, number, and case. For example, in the sentence «Er hat seinen Hut verloren» (He lost his hat), the pronoun «seinen» (his) agrees with the masculine noun «Hut» (hat), which is singular and in the accusative case.

Minor agreement is an essential aspect of German grammar, and mastering it is crucial for writing and speaking accurately in the language. As a professional, it is important to pay attention to minor agreement when editing German content to ensure it is grammatically correct and optimized for search engines.